Documented Information

Can we throw out our procedures or are we still locked in?

Can we throw out our procedures or are we still locked in?

ISO 9001:2015 and Documented Information

The first thing we heard about ISO 9001:2015 version was no more need for procedures, quality manuals or records. Hurray, hold a bonfire in the parking lot!

Hold the matches. We now have documented information in place of procedures, manuals and records. So is this an “I gotcha” on the part of ISO?

Not necessarily. Jump into the standard at section 7.4 Communication which says “The organization [your company] shall determine the internal and external communications relevant to the quality management system, including:

  1. a) on what it will communicate;
  2. b) when to communicate;
  3. c) with whom to communicate;
  4. d) how to communicate;
  5. e) who communicates.

This gives the company the leeway to communicate in manners other than written procedures. For example instead of having a Work Instruction on how to assemble a product or complete a form, the company could have a video employees could reference instead.

Where is Documented Information required?

In the ISO 9001:2008 there are 6 documented procedures. That is all you needed. So what about the 2015 revision?

Thumbing through the standard I found a requirement for documented information as follows:

  • 4.3 Determining the scope of the quality management system – “The scope of the organization’s quality management system shall be available and be maintained as documented information”
  • 4.4.2 To the extent necessary, the organization shall:

o   maintain documented information to support the operation of its process

o   retain documented information to have confidence that the processes are being carried out as planned

  • 5.2.2 Communicating the quality policy – “The quality policy shall be available and maintained as documented information
  • 6.2.1 Quality objectives and planning to achieve them – The organization shall maintain documented information on the quality objectives.
  • 7.1.5.1 General [Monitoring and measuring resources] -The organization shall retain appropriate documented information as evidence of fitness for purpose of the monitoring and measurement resources.
  • 7.2 Competence d) Retain appropriate documented information as evidence of competence
  • 7.5.1 General [Documented Information] –The organization’s quality management system shall include documented information required by this International Standard and documented information determined by the organization as being necessary for the effectiveness of the quality management system
  • 7.5.3.1 [Control of documented information]Documented information required by the quality management system and by this International Standard shall be controlled…..
  • 7.5.3.2 [Control of documented information]Documented information of external origin determined by the organization to be necessary for the planning and operation of the quality management system shall be identified as appropriate, and be controlled.
  • 8.1 Operational planning and control e)1) and 2) -The organization shall plan, implement and control the processes needed to meet the requirements for the provision of products and services, and to implement the actions determined in Clause 6 by: determining, maintaining and retaining documented information to the extent necessary to have confidence the processes have been carried out as planned and to demonstrate the conformity of products and services to their requirements
  • 8.2.3.2 [Review of the requirements for products and services] – The organization shall retain documented information as applicable on the results of the review and on any new requirements for the products and services.
  • 8.3.2 Design and development planning j) – the documented information needed to demonstrate that the design and development requirements have been met.
  • 8.3.3 Design and development inputs – The organization shall retain documented information on design and development inputs
  • 8.3.4 Design and development controls f) – The organization shall apply controls to the design and development process to ensure that documented information of these activities [a-e] is retained
  • 8.3.5 Design and development outputs – The organization shall retain documented information on design and development outputs
  • 8.3.6 Design and development changes – The organization shall retain documented information on design and development changes and the results of reviews and the authorization of the changes and the actions taken to prevent adverse impacts
  • 8.4.1 General [Control of externally provided processes, products and services] – The organization shall determine and apply criteria for the evaluation, selection, monitoring of performance and re-evaluation of external providers based on their ability to provide processes or products and services in accordance with the requirement. The organization shall retain documented information of these activities and any necessary actions arising from their evaluations.
  • 8.5.1 Control of production and service provision a) – Controlled conditions shall include, as applicable the availability of documented information that defines the characteristics of the products to be produced, the services to be provided, or the activities to be performed and the results to be achieved;
  • 8.5.2 Identification and traceability – The organization shall control the unique identification of the outputs when traceability is a requirement, and shall retain the documented information necessary to enable traceability.
  • 8.5.3 Property belonging to customers or external providers – When the property of a customer or external provider is lost, damaged, or otherwise found to be unsuitable for use, the organization shall report this to the customer or external provider and retain documented information on what has occurred.
  • 8.5.6 Control of changes – The organization shall retain documented information describing the  results of the review of changes, the person(s) authorizing the change, and any necessary actions arising from the review.
  • 8.6 Release of products and services -The organization shall retain documented information on the release of products and services. The documented information shall include evidence of conformity with the acceptance criteria and traceability to the person (s) authorizing the release.
  • 8.7.2 [Control of non-conforming outputs] – The organization shall retain documented information that describes the nonconformity, describes the actions taken, describes and concessions obtained, and identifies the authority deciding the action in respect of the non-conformity.
  • 9.1.1 General [Monitoring, measurement, analysis and evaluation] – The organization shall retain appropriate documented information as evidence of the results.
  • 9.2.2 [Internal audits] – The organization shall retain documented information as evidence for the implementation of the audit program and the audit results.
  • 9.3.3 Management review outputs – The organization shall retain documented information as evidence of the results of management reviews.
  • 10.2.2 [Nonconformity and corrective action] – The organization shall retain documented information as evidence of the nature of the nonconformities and any subsequent actions taken and the results of corrective action.

              Whew! That was a lot of documented information, about 30 by my count. So what does this mean, do we need 30 procedures now instead of six or zero as some consultants are claiming?

The Clues as to What to do for Documented Information

Retain Documented Information

First look for the word “retain” before documented information. In most cases this was a “record” in the 2008 version and about 2/3 of the referenced documented information requires information be retained.

If you have an ERP system or a design program or a project program or a database program which automatically retains information such as product test results and release authority there is no need for a procedure or manual directing you to save the data, your system does this for you. If there is not an automated system than there must be some way to communicate, “save this stuff this way”. Does it need to be a procedure? No, but a procedure may be the simplest and easiest method of communication.

The Other 1/3

So let’s look at the other 10 or so requirements of documented information.

  • Scope of the quality management system (QMS). Hopefully your QMS is part of the company’s strategic planning, if not there are some more basic issues going on which need to be addressed first. So the scope could be part of the strategic plan. It could also be addressed in a risk/opportunity matrix. Or it could simply be part of the company quality manual. Many companies will need to continue to provide a quality manual because it is a customer requirement. Do they need to regurgitate the standard? No. Put in them the information the standard and your customers require. Organize it to make sense to you, your customers, employees, regulators and any other interested party your company has identified.
  • The quality policy is documented information. It can be posted throughout the company via electronic message boards or bulletin boards. Ta da! You’ve got it. Of course the company will want to note which bulletin boards have it in case of an update, not all companies have electronic message boards.
  • Quality objectives and planning to achieve them should already be in place. An easy way to maintain them is with a project program like Basecamp. However, such a program isn’t necessary. It can simply be part of the management review minutes.
  • Information required by the standard and the organization must be controlled. This includes documents of external origin. So if there is data or communications which is vital to your QMS or that the standard tells the company it must have, it needs to exist and be protected against unauthorized changes. What this information is and how it is to be handled must be communicated. So if a video works, great. If a procedure is the answer, great. If the information is a regulation or a statute  than a link to the source of the information may be effective.
  • Documented information that the design requirements have been met will include specifications and drawings and records of design reviews. Again, this may be done with a specific program or communicated with a procedure.
  • Control of externally supplied products and services requires retained documented information about how suppliers are managed, evaluated and controlled. It is important to suppliers to have this information as well as retaining documented information so a system must be in place to control suppliers. A video might do a good job of explaining this or an e-mail or a procedure.

Summary

While procedures are no longer required, they may be the easiest and clearest form of communication for the who, what, where, when, why, and how of an activity. It is acceptable to have new and innovative ideas to communicate and retain documented information. So let’s hear your input. If you didn’t have to have a procedure how would you handle documented information?

Fitness for Use

Quality is fitness for use

Quality is fitness for use

Fitness for Use Categories

Dr Juran defined a non-conformance or reject or defect as “unfit for use”. Parts could be broken into one of four categories:

  • Fit for use and conforming to specification
  • Fit for use but not conforming to specifications
  • Not fit for use but conforming to specifications
  • Not fit for use, not conforming to specifications

Conforming to Specifications Not conforming to   specifications
Fit for use   These are no problem – no action is required This causes seriousInternal communications   problems
Not fit for use   This causes serious External communications   problems These are no problem – no action is required

 

Fitness for Use = Specifications

In two of the four categories, the specifications are useful. The supplier and the customer agree and the customer always get product that they want. When the parts are fit for use and conform to specifications product ships and everyone is happy. In the same way, if the product is not fit for use and does not meet the specification, the supplier will incur a cost but not lose a customer. Everyone is in agreement.

Fitness for Use≠ Specifications

Two of the categories generally lead to a level of (sometimes) controlled chaos. When the parts are fit for use but fail to meet the specification the specifications need to be changed. Understand fitness for use does not mean a product that will function but is cosmetically unsatisfactory. This product meets all the needs of the customer and they see no difference between these products and what they normally receive. Internal communications and conflict will occur until the specifications are revised.

The other category should be considered catastrophic for the supplier. The product does NOT meet the customer’s needs but the supplier views it as conforming to specification, or satisfactory product. It is here that a root cause analysis and long term preventive action is needed.

Controlling Specifications Controls Fitness for Use

Specifications are key documents for training and communication. The customer either sends their specifications or orders a catalog cut which defines the product performance. The first key step to controlling quality starts at Sales. When they take the order, they must understand and communicate the customer needs. If the customer does not what variations in color greater than .5 microns, sales must communicate this back to engineering. Engineering and manufacturing must look at the specifications and their process capability and decide of the specifications can be met. If not they must communicate back to Sales to negotiate a solution.

Clear communication at the start of the process which defines what can and cannot be done is the first step to good quality product, a satisfied customer, and a profit for the supplier.

 

Responsibilities

Quality is cyclical. Everyone contributes to the responsibilities

Quality is cyclical. Everyone contributes to the responsibilities

Who is Responsible for Quality?

Just who is responsible for quality; the customer or the processor or the supplier? Dr. Juran said they were all responsible for quality.

Customer Responsibilities

The customer must share in the responsibilities to produce a product that is fit for use. They must:

  • Transmit the needs to the supplier
  • Provide feedback to the supplier
  • Obtain feedback from the supplier

Transmitting the need is fairly clear. Provide accurate information as to specifications, delivery and expected costs. Providing feedback to the supplier is also easy to understand, if the product is unsatisfactory, tell them.

It is also necessary to provide positive feedback. At one company a customer service rep always did a little more for her clients. She would follow up on orders and check on their progress, not just in the MRP system but going out to the factory and making periodic physical checks. Thanks to her efforts more than a few errors were prevented. However, her supervisor had a performance measurement of time taking calls. When the rep was in the factory she wasn’t taking calls. There was no feedback system to her supervisor as to the effectiveness and importance of her actions so it did not appear on her performance reviews. Ultimately the rep was terminated.

The last bullet is one that is normally left out. Some of this comes from the concept “the customer is always right” or as one person put it “he who has the gold rules. The customer has the gold.” We supplied a product to an automotive manufacturer. The specification for the nut placement on the bolt was “8 mm max from the end”. Product shipped to specification. The first shift had been trained to slip on the product over both parts and tighten the nut. This was only possible if the nut had been backed off to the end of the bolt. The second shift slipped the product on one side and later inserted the other side. With the bolt backed off, the product would fall off before the assembly could be completed. Both shifts rejected the parts continually for the nut placement. The customer was furious over our “poor quality” back charging us and threatening to pull the business. They were not interested in hearing the cause of the problem. We were ordered to “fix it!” The fix – we sent our sales staff in once a month on both shifts to train the operators. The issue belonged to the customer they needed a mechanism to receive feedback.

Processor Responsibilities

The people and equipment producing the product are the most common owners of quality. They must:

  • Plan the process to meet the customer needs
  • Control the process to meet the customer needs
  • Improve the process based on customer feedback

This is the focus of most corrective actions and many people end up with the misconception that the processors own the quality responsibilities. This is not true. Quality is everyone’s job.

In my example of the customer service rep being fired for proactively checking in the factory, how many people caught the fact that she was addressing a symptom of poor quality and not the root cause? Since she was finding repeated mistakes in the process which would have produced poor quality parts, she should have gone to the person in charge and pointed out the situation. That should have resulted in root cause analysis and corrective action and she would not have needed to be in the factory.

Supplier Responsibilities

The supplier is the company as a whole that takes and order and provides a good or service. The supplier is also the previous step in the process. It is imperative that the supplier:

  • Knows who are the customers
  • Understands the needs of the customers
  • Avoid creating problems for the customers
  • Obtains feedback from the customers

As a company it is not enough to understand your own product and offer a “take it or leave it” attitude. The world is competitive and someone else is willing to step in and understand the customer’s needs and deliver exactly what they need, when they need it. A supplier must understand how the product is being used and proactively offer goods or services that best fit the customer needs. In the example of the nut position, we did offer to make two part numbers with the only difference being the nut location. The down side was maintaining inventories so the ultimate solution was for our staff to train the customer’s operators. Once we went in and talked to the people using the parts we were able to come up with a solution that avoided a problem for the customer. Did the customer fail to take on the responsibility to train their operators? Yes. Did we step up and solve the customer problem? Yes.

In the case of the internal customer, it is important to know how our product/subassembly/service is used. At one plant, a subassembly was a piece of cord cut to a set length and dropped into a gaylord then shipped across the ocean. At the next step the operator would attach the cord to a hook and wind the cord up, securing it with a rubber-band. As you can imagine the cords were twisted and tangled together and difficult to separate, wasting a great deal of time and frustrating the operator. The ultimate solution was to buy the cord in spools and set up a machine to attach the cord, measure and cut to length and automatically wind it. As an interim step the people cutting the cord would wind and rubber-band it with a tail sticking out to have the hook attached. The time to do the next operation was cut to a fraction of the original time. An interesting by-product was the wound cords took up less space and decreased the shipping cost as well.

Quality is everyone’s responsibility. It is the customer’s responsibility, the processor’s responsibility and the supplier’s responsibility. When each takes their responsibilities and acts on it the overall cost goes down and the quality improves.

How Come Hardly Anything Ever Gets Better? The Case for Quality Improvement.

How do you create quality improvement?

Quality Improvement from the Quality College

In 1987, I had the privilege to attend the Quality College in Winter Park, FL. It was a highly informative week and I have kept the binder and used it as a reference ever since, although I haven’t gone back to it for a few years.

When I started to develop a page for the teachings of Philip Crosby I pulled out the binder and reviewed the material. Near the back I found a letter from Philip Crosby titled “How come hardly anything ever gets better?” A similar question was posted on LinkedIn so it seemed a good place to start.

Mr. Crosby’s first point was that no one, not the powerful or the powerless were against quality improvement. All of his books, speeches and educational material showed the financial fact that doing things right the first time cost less than doing things wrong and fixing them. Products, services, prisons, morals, the judiciary, Congress, movies, taxis – just about everything needs improvement.

Since everyone was in favor of improvement and opportunities abound, there should be an epidemic of things getting better. That begged the question; why is hardly anything getting better?

Who is Responsible for Quality Improvement?

Mr. Crosby came up with 3 basic reasons:

  1. The highest paid and most talented people in a company do not work on improvement. They produce strategy books, planning manuals, marketing reports, five year plans etc that are shown like merit badges but are not used or implemented. Everyone is working hard on things that make little difference.
  2. People who understand a subject do not get help in determining a policy for improvement. Nationally known consumer advocate groups have no experience in quality management. Most business media experts talk about quality and yet their experience is limited. Getting a common definition of “quality” would be difficult and it has been overlaid with emotion.
  3. 3.      Management and labor do not understand each other. There are very few members of management that have ever actually done the work they supervise. Motivation of the workers is the most popular theme for quality improvement programs. Yet it is management that needs to realize they are the cause of the problems by the way they manage. Union management falls into the same boat as company executives.

The Results of Quality Improvement

Companies that create a renaissance in terms of changing management operating attitudes have drastically improved their products and services and reaped the reward to the bottom line. Companies have already paid for quality, isn’t it time they should get what is coming to them?

Has There Been Quality Improvement?

As I read the letter in many ways I agreed with Mr. Crosby. However looking back over the past 25 years, I also realized that we have come a very long way in large part thanks to Mr. Crosby, Dr. Deming, Dr Juran and Dr. Shewhart. So I invite you to comment. What improvements have you seen? Are things getting better or is hardly anything getting better?

What Does ISO Stand For?

ISO means working together for standardization

Where Did the Name ISO Come From?

ISO is the anachronism for “International Organization for Standardization”. It is not the” International Standards Organization”. The anachronism would have been different in each country – IOS in English, OIN in French. To avoid any problems this would create the founders gave it a short, all-purpose name. They chose “ISO” from the Greek isos meaning “equal”. So whatever the country or language, the short form is always ISO.

What does the ISO do?

The International Organization for Standardization is the world’s largest developer and publisher of international standards. Did you ever wonder who came up the with standard size of a sea-tainer or a tablet of paper? It was the International Organization for Standardization. Most of the time we don’t think about standards, we just expect things to fit and to work well and safely. Standards are hidden given only noticed when absent. The International Organization for Standardization has more than 19,000 international standards. The International Standards provide a common technological language facilitating trade and the transfer of technology.

How Did ISO Get Started?

In 1946 delegates from 25 countries met and decided to create a new international organization with the objective “to facilitate the international coordination and unification of industrial standards”. It officially began operations February 23, 1947. It is not a governmental organization but a network of 163 countries, one member per country, with the central secretary in Geneva, Switzerland that coordinates the system.  Some the members are part of their government structure, others are from the private sector, usually from a national partnership of industry associations. Each member has one vote and all members are on equal footing. Standards are based on consensus among experts in the field and are periodically reviewed, usually every five years to see if they should be maintained, updated, or withdrawn. The standards are voluntary and market driven. There is no legal authority to enforce the implementation of the standards.

How Are ISO 9001, ISO 14001, ISO 27001, ISO 26001 Different?

The majority of the standards are specific to a particular product, material or process. However ISO 9001 (Quality), ISO 14001 (Environmental management), ISO 27001 (information security) and ISO 26001 (social responsibility)are generic management system that can be implemented in any organization, no matter the size, product or sector.

If you would like to learn about how International Organization for Standardization is financed and new standards are selected for development go to http://www.iso.org/iso/about.htm

 

Point 14 – Top Management Commitment to Action

Clearly define top management’s permanent commitment to ever improving quality and
productivity, and their obligation to implement all of these principles. Indeed, it is not enough that top management commit themselves for life to quality and productivity. They must know what it is that they are committed to—that is, what they must do. Create a structure in top management that will push every day on the preceding 13 Points, and take action in order to accomplish the transformation. Support is not enough: action is required!

Dr. W. Edwards Deming

What is Management’s Job – Commitment to Action

One of my father’s favorite sayings was, “lead, follow or get out of the way”. Management’s job is to lead. There must be a commitment to constant and on-going improvement. Each and every morning, management must look at their operation and decide what needs improvement and make a commitment to take action.

The Price of Failed Commitment to Action

If management does not make a commitment to constant and on-going improvement, it
will not happen. Management does not have to implement  the change but they must lead the change or their employees will end up building internal empires or chasing projects with
a lower value to the company.

Part of creating this commitment is developing a structure that guides the employees to
an on-going commitment of improvements in quality and productivity. Management must establish a system, indicate its’ importance to the company and demonstrate their own commitment to constantly and forever improving. It does not have to be fancy, but management must believe and support it.

The Call for Commitment to Action

There is a childhood chant, “Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will
never hurt me.” I wish it were true. How many suicides were prompted by cruel words? Words have power, the power to build up or the power to tear down.When management stands up and says “this is who we are and this is what we stand for” it can change the world.

My first job was with an ethical pharmaceutical company. We had a simple rule,
“Would you want your child to take this medicine?” If the answer was no, we threw it away. Every person on the line had the ability to call the supervisor and point out a problem. Each and every person on that line knew the importance of what they did and that attitude came from the top down. The VP of manufacturing walked through the plant several times a day and any operator
could stop him with a question or a concern. We had power and pride.

So what are you going to do, lead, follow or get out of the way?

Sick of the Green Revolution

“If I have one more person tell me I need to make my company Green, I’m going to become politically incorrect.” This statement was made in a CEO round-table meeting and perfectly describes the frustration business owners feel. Sales are down, the economy is questionable and they are being pressured to make an investment because it is the “right thing to do”. The first priority is to stay in business and find a way to make payroll. Getting pressured to make what they perceive as unrealistic investments for a feel-good
moment is not something a wise business owner does.

Unfortunately, they couldn’t be more wrong.

The Start of the Green Revolution

In the early 1990’s, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) created the environmental standard ISO 14000 as a response to conservation initiatives from the 1970’s. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_14000.Unlike the more well known ISO 9000 Quality Standard, ISO 14000 was not required by most clients, for one simple reason, all cost benefits went to the implementer. ISO 9000 allowed clients to eliminate costly auditing staff, supplier audits and incoming inspection. There was a direct benefit to the
client to insist the supplier implement ISO 9000. The benefit for the implementation of ISO 14000 was indirect so many companies did not include it as a requirement to do business with them.

Why Aren’t Business Owners joining the Green Revolution

Suppliers had limited resources and meeting the customer requirements was the first priority. ISO 14000 got lost in the shuffle as few people had time to analyze the standard and realize the cost benefits.

How does ISO 14000 Relate to the Green Revolution?

The purpose of ISO 14000 standard is to create a continuous improvement process to reduce consumption and waste. If a company can make more product using less materials and energy, and has to pay less to process waste, the unit cost of producing their product is reduced. This gives the business owner the option of increasing profits or reducing price and increasing sales. Still business
owners did not see ISO 14000 as something they wanted to pursue. To make it more palatable to the average business owner, ISO 9000 and ISO 14000 have been gradually changing to make them so similar they can be implemented through thesame process and systems. Companies already meeting ISO 9000 will have little or no difficulty incorporating ISO 14000.

Frequently the barrier to implementing continuous improvement in reduced consumption and waste is a capital investment.http://technacon.com/… However, due to the Green Revolution significant grants are available to help
companies across this hurdle. Now is the time to embrace the Green Revolution, implement ISO 14000 and increase profitability. Joining the Green Revolution could make more business sense than it does today.

Point 12 – Pride of Workmanship is Power

Pride of Workmanship is Power

Permit pride of workmanship
Remove the barriers that rob hourly workers, and people in management, of their
right to pride of workmanship. This implies, among other things, abolition of
the annual merit rating (appraisal of performance) and of Management by
Objective. Again, the responsibility of managers, supervisors, foremen must be
changed from sheer numbers to quality.

Dr.W. Edwards Deming

The Never Ending Motivator – Pride of Workmanship

There was a Disney movie about the Jamaican bobsled team, titled “Cool
Runnings”. One of the characters, Junior, lacked self-confidence. He
lacked pride in workmanship. One of his teammates gave him guidance. He had
Junior look into the mirror and see “pride” and “power” and a “crazy [person] that
didn’t take nothing from nobody”. It was a turning point for both Junior and
ultimately the team. Creating that kind of pride in workmanship in employees is
the most effective thing a manager can do.

The manager doesn’t need to stand over the operator or pour through charts to see
if the employee did it right. The manager could go play golf because the person
with pride of workmanship is making the best part possible without supervision.

Instilling Pride of Workmanship

When I worked in pharmaceuticals, pride of workmanship was the first thing we
instilled. We simply asked each employee to ask themselves one question;
“Would you want your loved one to take this particular bottle of medicine?”. If the answer was “no”, we didn’t want to sell it
because someone’s loved one would be taking it.

I’ve had clients say to me, yes but something like medicine is easy to create pride in workmanship but our
product isn’t. Generally, I ask them where is the product used and if it fails
what is the worst that can happen. A plastic disposable cover can be sharp and
cut the user or provide a choking hazard. A component in a car or truck or
school bus can fail and the vehicle could crash.

If you can do a Failure Mode and Effect Analysis, you have a tool for instilling pride of workmanship. If
the IT system fails will a company shutdown and put people out of work? If a
report is sloppy and sends management down a wrong path will the company close?
If a customer service rep is surly and the client goes somewhere else, what is
the long run impact on the company? It is the manager’s job to teach the
employee why they are important to the company and should take pride in
workmanship.

Killing Pride of Workmanship

Unfortunately, killing pride of workmanship is all too easy. Ignore an employee when they warn
you of a problem. Ta-da, pride in workmanship just took a major blow and
“I just keep my head down and my mouth shut and collect my pay”
becomes the attitude of the day. Give the employee bad tools, either machines
needing maintenance or reports filled with bad or missing information and the
result is a loss of pride in workmanship. Set an arbitrary goal the employee
can not possible achieve and you rob them of pride of workmanship. Tell the
employee to do a task, reprimand them if they do it wrong but don’t give them
the tools to measure and know if they did it right or wrong and frustration
will kill pride of workmanship. Killing pride of workmanship is way too easy.

You Matter = Pride in Workmanship

To create and maintain pride in workmanship in your staff, make sure they know
they matter. Listen if they tell you “there is a problem” and don’t
shoot the messenger. If they are wrong take the time to make sure they know why
it isn’t a problem.

Each time a manager helps to grow the understanding of an
employee in job knowledge, the manager creates pride in workmanship. The cost
is small, no big raise, no creative title, just recognition that the employee
makes a difference in the overall performance of the company.

When a manager creates pride in workmanship their employees they create the best sales tool in
the world – consistent high quality product. When an employee knows they are
creating high quality product their pride in workmanship increases and the
company reaps the benefit.

Point 11 – Arbitrary Numerical Targets

 

Is your management review a continuous improvement tool or an arbitrary numerical target?

Management Review – a Continuous Improvement Tool or Generator of Arbitrary Numerical Targets

 

Eliminate arbitrary numerical targets
Eliminate work standards that prescribe quotas for the work force and numerical goals for people in management. Substitute aids and helpful leadership in order to achieve continual improvement of quality and productivity.
Dr. W. Edwards Deming

Doing it Wrong – Management by Arbitrary Numerical Targets

I think the key phrase is “arbitrary numerical targets”. Various companies I
worked for over the years have had management goals and objectives. Sometimes
the managers chose them, sometimes we were guided in them, and at a few it was
just an outright order. At one particular company we had to find either a 10%
increase in productivity or a 10% reduction in costs each year. To the outside
world we were setting our own goals. In reality we were working to arbitrary
numerical targets. The glossy projection sheets and plans appeared to be the
desires of a motivated workforce. We were motivated alright, we either
delivered on the arbitrary numerical target or lost our jobs.
The reason these goals were arbitrary numerical targets was they were identified
using the wrong method. Management did not sit in the management review and
look at the reported performance, and ask the staff to participate in continuous improvement. They looked at how much money they needed to bring in
to be a hero and then told everyone to deliver on arbitrary numerical targets.

Doing it Right – Management by Continuous Improvement not Arbitrary Numerical Targets

There was one company I worked for that did this right. They decided, from the data
in the management review, which was the worst performing press in the plant. It
was one of those bad economic times and no one had money to replace the
machine. Management built a team of operators, mechanics, supervisors and
engineers and turned the machine over to them. They didn’t set an arbitrary
numerical goal, they asked “what would you do to make this run better?”
The team cleaned the machine and then ran an order. Any place there was an oil leak,
they fixed it. They figured out why the leak had occurred in the first place
and where necessary made improvements in replacement parts like bearings and
seals. Once the machine was functioning as designed, they implemented the
Plan-Do-Check-Act process. They analyzed the production on the next order and
tweaked the machine and tooling. They adjusted gages so they were easy to read
and ran another order. By the time they got through, the machine was producing
at 130% of design with a part-time operator. No arbitrary numerical target
would have set the goal this team achieved.

Which Way Are You – Management Review to Eliminate Arbitrary Numerical Targets

A key tool in eliminating arbitrary numerical targets is the management review. If done well, it leads to aiding the improvement of quality and productivity. If done poorly it leads to arbitrary numerical goals. Look at how the process is managed. Are reports put into place to pass the audit or are they a tool to identifying problems and solutions? Who contributes to the reports? Is this a “dog and pony show” or are
employees encouraged to talk openly without fear of losing their jobs? If a
company wishes to create continuous improvement, to stay in business and create
jobs, then the first place they need to look is the management review. So what
does your management review generate; continuous improvement or arbitrary
numerical targets?

Point 7 – Leaders Help Others

 

helping others

 

 

Institute leadership
Adopt and institute leadership aimed at helping people do a better job. The responsibility of managers and supervisors must be changed from sheer numbers to quality. Improvement of quality will automatically improve productivity. Management must ensure that immediate action is taken on reports of inherited defects, maintenance requirements, poor tools, fuzzy operational definitions, and all conditions detrimental to quality.
W.
Edwards Deming

 

Leaders
Help Others Do a Better Job
“Lead, follow or get out of the way” was one of my
father’s favorite sayings. I could call on Dad at any hour for help in physics,
or building, or just about anything other than cars. Dad wouldn’t do things for
me. He did show me tricks and short cuts and rules of analysis that allowed me
to do it myself. This is the essence of what Dr. Deming is talking about when
he says to institute leadership. Real leaders help other do a better job.
Managers are Leaders
and Help Others
As a manager your job is to teach, aid and assist your
employees to be successful and productive. Not to do the job for them. Like Dad
you are there with your door open, always investigation tools that will make it
easier for your employees to do a quality job with high productivity. You must
be available as a resource and then sometimes you must tie a gag on your mouth
and let an employee learn from a mistake. However, a good leader sets up the
employee for success not failure and never plays “I gotcha”
The Benefits of
Leaders who Help Others
If you are good at your job, then your employees will be
also. If your employees are good at their jobs they will be more productive,
and produce good quality work. The company will be more profitable and stay in
business providing jobs. It is so simple, good leaders help others.
Institute leadership

helping others