The Absolutes of Quality

Mr. Philip Crosby created a chart titled “The Absolutes of Quality”.

1980’s Conventional Wisdom

 

Reality

Goodness 

Definition of quality

Conformance to requirements
Appraisal 

System to create quality

Prevention

Quality levels 

Performance Standard

Zero defects

Indexes or process levels 

Measurement

Price of Non-conformance

 

Definition of Quality

In the 1980’s “quality” was more of a feeling then a measureable element. Quality was a superior product as far as features. It might be a nicer finish to a piece of furniture or an accessory on a car. The idea that quality was conformance to requirements was a radical change. With the advent of ISO 9001, meeting the customer requirements became a “given” as the definition for quality.

Sorting bad product from good

System to Create Quality

Prevention is the current system prosperous companies use to produce a product the conforms to customer requirements. The majority of executives and managers understand the concept that the system must create 100% conforming product. Not that long ago, the method of producing a quality product was t o make a bunch of widgets and sort out the defective parts. Yes there was an army of inspectors at every plant. There was even a television ad for a brand of underwear that told people it wasn’t a quality product until inspector 12 said it was.

Quality Performance Standard

Of course 100% inspection was cost prohibitive so companies used inspection tables. The most well known was MIL-STD 105. First the manufacturer and the customer agreed as to the acceptable percentage of defects in the shipment. They would use the MIL STD 105 to determine a samples size and how many defects they could find and still ship the product. Now if current companies found a single defect in a sample, the product would be quarantined, a root cause analysis started, and a corrective and preventive action implemented.

Measurement of Quality

Measuring the Cost of Quality was unheard of in the 1980’s. Inspection and scrap were a cost of doing business and were built into the price of the product. Today, most companies track both the cost of conformance and the cost of non-conformance. If they are following ISO 9001 they also have a system to generation projects to reduce the total cost of quality.

Quality Today

So here is a question: Does your company track the cost of quality?

Comments

  1. I’m impressed, I have to admit. Rarely do I come across a blog that’s both equally educative
    and entertaining, and let me tell you, you have hit
    the nail on the head. The issue is something which not enough people are speaking intelligently
    about. I am very happy that I stumbled across this in my search for something relating to this.

  2. Thank you! I think the gurus of the 1980’s are just as important today. Next up is Dr. Joseph Juran. I hope I can do him justice.

  3. I have to thank you for the efforts you’ve put in writing
    this blog. I am hoping to view the same high-grade blog posts by you later on as well.
    In truth, your creative writing abilities has encouraged me to get my own,
    personal website now 😉

  4. Thank you. Right now I am working on video’s giving similar information. I look forward to seeing your blog!

  5. Can I simply say what a comfort to discover somebody that really knows what they’re talking
    about on the web. You certainly realize how
    to bring an issue to light and make it important.
    More and more people really need to read this and understand this side of the story.
    I was surprised that you are not more popular given that you definitely possess the gift.

Speak Your Mind

*