Fitness for Use

Quality is fitness for use

Quality is fitness for use

Fitness for Use Categories

Dr Juran defined a non-conformance or reject or defect as “unfit for use”. Parts could be broken into one of four categories:

  • Fit for use and conforming to specification
  • Fit for use but not conforming to specifications
  • Not fit for use but conforming to specifications
  • Not fit for use, not conforming to specifications

Conforming to Specifications Not conforming to   specifications
Fit for use   These are no problem – no action is required This causes seriousInternal communications   problems
Not fit for use   This causes serious External communications   problems These are no problem – no action is required

 

Fitness for Use = Specifications

In two of the four categories, the specifications are useful. The supplier and the customer agree and the customer always get product that they want. When the parts are fit for use and conform to specifications product ships and everyone is happy. In the same way, if the product is not fit for use and does not meet the specification, the supplier will incur a cost but not lose a customer. Everyone is in agreement.

Fitness for Use≠ Specifications

Two of the categories generally lead to a level of (sometimes) controlled chaos. When the parts are fit for use but fail to meet the specification the specifications need to be changed. Understand fitness for use does not mean a product that will function but is cosmetically unsatisfactory. This product meets all the needs of the customer and they see no difference between these products and what they normally receive. Internal communications and conflict will occur until the specifications are revised.

The other category should be considered catastrophic for the supplier. The product does NOT meet the customer’s needs but the supplier views it as conforming to specification, or satisfactory product. It is here that a root cause analysis and long term preventive action is needed.

Controlling Specifications Controls Fitness for Use

Specifications are key documents for training and communication. The customer either sends their specifications or orders a catalog cut which defines the product performance. The first key step to controlling quality starts at Sales. When they take the order, they must understand and communicate the customer needs. If the customer does not what variations in color greater than .5 microns, sales must communicate this back to engineering. Engineering and manufacturing must look at the specifications and their process capability and decide of the specifications can be met. If not they must communicate back to Sales to negotiate a solution.

Clear communication at the start of the process which defines what can and cannot be done is the first step to good quality product, a satisfied customer, and a profit for the supplier.

 

Quality Management

Management requires everyone to work together for quality
Management requires everyone to work together for quality

A Fundamental Concept for Quality Management

Dr. Joseph M. Juran taught that quality management used the same three processes as financial management. They are:

  • Quality Planning
  • Quality Control
  • Quality Improvement

Quality Management – Quality Planning

Of the three elements, inadequate quality planning is a major source of quality deficiencies. Many of the remedies for quality improvement projects consist of re-planning quality. The best way to deal with poor quality is to prevent it in the first place. The earlier in the process a cause of poor quality can be removed the lower the cost to the company.

Quality Management – Quality Control

In creating quality control it is important to choose what to control, establish a unit of measurement, establish performance standards, measure performance, interpret the difference between actual versus the standard, take action on the difference. This is similar to Dr. Deming’s Plan-Do-check-Act cycle.http://technacon.com/category/dr-w-edward-deming

Quality Management – Quality Improvement

Improvement is created on a project by project basis. The first step is to identify specific projects, organize teams, discover causes, develop remedies, prove the effectiveness of the remedies, deal with cultural resistance, and establish controls to the hold the gains.

Quality Management – Return on Investment

As a rough rule of thumb, the average improvement project is worth $100,000 per year in decrease waste/cost while the average one-time cost is approximately $10,000-20,000.

Quality Management – Lessons learned

Some of the lessons learn through applying quality improvement projects are:

  • The return on investment in quality improvement is among the highest available to managers and quality improvement is not capital intensive.
  • The most decisive factor in the race for quality leadership is the rate of quality improvement

 

http://www.qualitycoach.net/products/jurans-quality-handbook-the-complete-guide-to-performance-excellence-9780071629737.asp

Quality Management follows the same basic principles as financial management, has a high return on investment and a low capital investment requirement.

Responsibilities

Quality is cyclical. Everyone contributes to the responsibilities

Quality is cyclical. Everyone contributes to the responsibilities

Who is Responsible for Quality?

Just who is responsible for quality; the customer or the processor or the supplier? Dr. Juran said they were all responsible for quality.

Customer Responsibilities

The customer must share in the responsibilities to produce a product that is fit for use. They must:

  • Transmit the needs to the supplier
  • Provide feedback to the supplier
  • Obtain feedback from the supplier

Transmitting the need is fairly clear. Provide accurate information as to specifications, delivery and expected costs. Providing feedback to the supplier is also easy to understand, if the product is unsatisfactory, tell them.

It is also necessary to provide positive feedback. At one company a customer service rep always did a little more for her clients. She would follow up on orders and check on their progress, not just in the MRP system but going out to the factory and making periodic physical checks. Thanks to her efforts more than a few errors were prevented. However, her supervisor had a performance measurement of time taking calls. When the rep was in the factory she wasn’t taking calls. There was no feedback system to her supervisor as to the effectiveness and importance of her actions so it did not appear on her performance reviews. Ultimately the rep was terminated.

The last bullet is one that is normally left out. Some of this comes from the concept “the customer is always right” or as one person put it “he who has the gold rules. The customer has the gold.” We supplied a product to an automotive manufacturer. The specification for the nut placement on the bolt was “8 mm max from the end”. Product shipped to specification. The first shift had been trained to slip on the product over both parts and tighten the nut. This was only possible if the nut had been backed off to the end of the bolt. The second shift slipped the product on one side and later inserted the other side. With the bolt backed off, the product would fall off before the assembly could be completed. Both shifts rejected the parts continually for the nut placement. The customer was furious over our “poor quality” back charging us and threatening to pull the business. They were not interested in hearing the cause of the problem. We were ordered to “fix it!” The fix – we sent our sales staff in once a month on both shifts to train the operators. The issue belonged to the customer they needed a mechanism to receive feedback.

Processor Responsibilities

The people and equipment producing the product are the most common owners of quality. They must:

  • Plan the process to meet the customer needs
  • Control the process to meet the customer needs
  • Improve the process based on customer feedback

This is the focus of most corrective actions and many people end up with the misconception that the processors own the quality responsibilities. This is not true. Quality is everyone’s job.

In my example of the customer service rep being fired for proactively checking in the factory, how many people caught the fact that she was addressing a symptom of poor quality and not the root cause? Since she was finding repeated mistakes in the process which would have produced poor quality parts, she should have gone to the person in charge and pointed out the situation. That should have resulted in root cause analysis and corrective action and she would not have needed to be in the factory.

Supplier Responsibilities

The supplier is the company as a whole that takes and order and provides a good or service. The supplier is also the previous step in the process. It is imperative that the supplier:

  • Knows who are the customers
  • Understands the needs of the customers
  • Avoid creating problems for the customers
  • Obtains feedback from the customers

As a company it is not enough to understand your own product and offer a “take it or leave it” attitude. The world is competitive and someone else is willing to step in and understand the customer’s needs and deliver exactly what they need, when they need it. A supplier must understand how the product is being used and proactively offer goods or services that best fit the customer needs. In the example of the nut position, we did offer to make two part numbers with the only difference being the nut location. The down side was maintaining inventories so the ultimate solution was for our staff to train the customer’s operators. Once we went in and talked to the people using the parts we were able to come up with a solution that avoided a problem for the customer. Did the customer fail to take on the responsibility to train their operators? Yes. Did we step up and solve the customer problem? Yes.

In the case of the internal customer, it is important to know how our product/subassembly/service is used. At one plant, a subassembly was a piece of cord cut to a set length and dropped into a gaylord then shipped across the ocean. At the next step the operator would attach the cord to a hook and wind the cord up, securing it with a rubber-band. As you can imagine the cords were twisted and tangled together and difficult to separate, wasting a great deal of time and frustrating the operator. The ultimate solution was to buy the cord in spools and set up a machine to attach the cord, measure and cut to length and automatically wind it. As an interim step the people cutting the cord would wind and rubber-band it with a tail sticking out to have the hook attached. The time to do the next operation was cut to a fraction of the original time. An interesting by-product was the wound cords took up less space and decreased the shipping cost as well.

Quality is everyone’s responsibility. It is the customer’s responsibility, the processor’s responsibility and the supplier’s responsibility. When each takes their responsibilities and acts on it the overall cost goes down and the quality improves.

5 Ways to Assure to the Success of a Quality Improvement Process

 

Assuring the success of a Quality Improvement process

Mr. Philip Crosby did a lot of work with various companies and he came up with the following 5 points from his experience. While my experience is not as world-renowned as his, it has demonstrated the accuracy of these points.

Make Sure  Management’s Commitment to Quality Improvement is Genuine and Evident

 This is the #1 reason a quality improvement process fails. If management is saying the words but does not mean them, employees will know and will only give a cursor level of investment in the quality improvement process. If a middle manager is trying to do this knowing their management is not on board, they will have very limited, short-term success.

Keep the Quality Improvement Process Serious, but Fun

This is people’s livelihoods on the line. Do this wrong and jobs are going away, most likely yours will be one of the first to go. Select serious issues but be willing to let team members be spontaneous and open. Sometimes the only way to create that spark in a quality improvement process is with a little humor.

Make Sure Everything in the Quality Improvement Process is Positive and Handled with Respect.

The team must be equal. This means no one person’s opinion is more valued than the other team members and no one’s opinion is less valuable than the other team members. There is a reason people are on the quality improvement process team. Have a non-judgmental way to capture ideas and evaluate them.

Make Sure All Managers Are Involved in the Quality Improvement Process,

Understand the Concepts and Steps of the Quality Improvement Process, and Are Able to Effectively Communicate Them with Subordinates.

Hold a discussion with the managers about the quality improvement process. Encourage them to speak about their concerns and then address those concerns. It takes only one manager saying all the right things but quietly placing roadblocks to the process to bring the quality improvement process to a grinding halt. Watch for the team member that has not had the time to complete an assignment and consider what action needs to be taken with their manager. That should include identifying a non-supportive manager and turning that problem over to the next level up.

Adapt the Quality Improvement Process to the Company and/or Location’s Personality

This is a process and depending on the company culture it can take many forms. If everyone has a 4 year degree and works in a paperless system, the process will be much different than for a company where the majority of employees cannot read or write in any language and communications is through pictures and colored tags. One is not better than the other. The quality Improvement process must fit the culture.

14 Steps to Establish Process Improvement

This article is presented as part of an overview of the quality guru’s of the 1980’s. The 14 steps were develop by Mr. Philip Crosby and presented by Philip Crosby Associates. Reading “Quality Is Free”, “Quality Without Tears”, and “Quality Without Pain” are helpful in understanding how Mr. Crosby developed his philosophy and encouraged others to use it. For more information about Philip Crosby Associates, go to http://www.philipcrosby.com/pca/index.html.

Quality Councils guide the quality Improvement Process

Step 1 of the 14 Steps – Management Commitment for Process Improvement

Management must make clear where it stands on quality. Without top management commitment the process is doomed to failure (see “Four Ways a Quality Improvement Process Can Fail” and “Five Ways to Assure the Success of a Quality Improvement Process”).Top management must communicate it has a zero defect strategy if it wants a quality improvment process. The primary action to accomplish this is to write and communicate a Quality Policy. In ISO 9001 all documentation comes from the philosophy in the quality policy. This is the reason why that is so important.

Step 2 of the 14 Steps – Quality Improvement Team to Create Process Improvement

A framework is needed to coordinate the quality improvement process which is driven by the quality improvement team. This is the vehicle to remove roadblocks to progress and provides a formal communications medium to ensure the quality improvement efforts are coordinated throughout the company. Each department should have a representative on the team and a charter is needed. The team members take responsibility for one or more of the 14 steps. This team is not the problem solving team but manages the various activities associated with quality improvement throughout the company.

Step 3 of the 14 Steps – Measurement of Process Improvement

One definition of insanity is doing the same thing repeatedly and expecting a different result. Measurement is the determination of the result. Teams measure the difference their changes have made. Measurement is done in simple terms of things (part XYZ) or events (shutdowns or recalls) and compared to past performance to see if it is a process improvement, no change or a deterioration.

Step 4 of the 14 Steps – Cost of Quality and Process Improvement

The Cost of Quality takes “things” and “events” and converts them to a common language – money. The group charged with making the change does not monetize their efforts this is done at a central level providing for consistency of costing. (see “The Cost of Quality”) Speaking in terms of money allows managment to justify the costs to create process improvement.

Step 5 of the 14 Steps – Quality Awareness as it Relates to Process Improvement

The purpose of Quality Awareness is to raise the personal concern felt by all employees toward the conformance of the product or service and the quality reputation of the company.[1] As Dr. Deming also said in his 14 points, we are all dependent on each other. Process improvment can not occur unless the entire team agrees it is needed.

Step 6 of the 14 Steps – Corrective Action for Process Improvement

Corrective Action Systems respond to 3 sets of rules – Input rules, Administrative rules, and output rules. Corrective action looks for systematic rather than anecdotal solutions. The process should have steps and be formalized throughout a company. They should be designed to eliminate compromising on conformance to requirements. Implement “Do It Right the First Time” to create process improvement.

Step 7 and 9 of 14 Steps – Zero Defects Planning and Zero Defects Day impact on Process Improvement

Zero Defects day is designed to be an event to create a personal experience for all employees so they know a permanent change, a process improvement, has been made. Management is committed and this is a process not a project. It will not go away.

Step 8 of 14 Steps – Employee Education Creates Process Improvement

All employees must understand the Absolutes of Quality so they can competently carry out their role in the quality improvement process. This means an education plan as well as reference documentation such as procedures and work instructions. Treat Suppliers as if they were employees when it comes to education.

Step 10 of 14 Steps – Goal Setting for Process Improvement

Total quality is achieved incrementally over time but in order to keep focused on process improvement it is important to establish realistic goals. Employees must participate in the goal setting and have a say in what can be accomplished in a defined timeframe.

Step 11 of 14 Steps – Error Cause Removal in Process Improvement

Employees have to be able to communicate roadblocks to accomplishing quality improvement process. Communication must flow in both directions; management must make expectations clear and employees must define issues and concerns that they believe will prevent them from being successful. The process to do so should be simple and formal with procedures  and assigned responsibilities to address employee concerns.

Step 12 of 14 Steps – Recognition of Process Improvement Efforts

Everyone needs to know their hard work was recognized. A quality improvement process must include a formal program to recognize both individuals and groups for their actions which create quality improvement.

Step 13 of 14 Steps – Quality Councils for Process Improvement

The purpose of this step is to bring together the appropriate people to share information that may benefit other areas of the company. In a large company with multiple divisions it could be a periodic meeting of the quality managers. They must also audit the quality improvement process for effectiveness and be will to go to management if the system is not functioning as planned.

Step 14 of 14 Steps – Do It All Over Again for Continuous Process Improvement

A quality improvement process never ends. It must be a permanent management responsibility. The focus must be to always satisfy the customer. At this time the Quality Improvement team changes although at least one member of the old team must stay on to provide information and continuity in the quality improvment process.

 

 



[1] “Quality Improvement Process Management College Manual” @1987 pg 4-6-1 “Purpose”

Four Ways a Quality Improvement Process Can Fail

 

Is your Quality Improvement Process destined for success or failure?

While reading through the binder I received in 1987 from the Philip Crosby Quality College in Winter Park, FL I came across a section titled ‘Four Ways a Quality Improvement Process Can Fail’. I was expecting something that quality professionals had created fail-safes to prevent. What I found instead was four conditions  that are just as valid today as they were in 1987.

Failure #1 – Lack of Management Attention to the Quality Improvement Process

That’s it. Either management is on-board with a Quality Improvement Process or they are not. It is the reason the Management Review is so critical to the success of ISO 9001 companies. If management is involved in providing resources and determining which projects have what priority than the company is on the right road for a successful Quality Improvement Process.

Failure #2 –  Allowing the Quality Improvement Process to Become a Motivational Program

When the Quality Improvement Process goes from creating real and lasting preventive measures and becomes a method to “get the employees involve” or create “caring” in the employees it will fail. Employees will see through the rhetoric and realize management is not serious or interested. The expectation is the employees will change in some way rather than the system.

Failure #3 -Focusing the Quality Improvement Process Only on Operations

Operations makes the widgets that get sold but the cause of non-conformances can occur in order entry, purchasing, engineering, logistics – any area of the company. That is why ISO 9001 is a quality management system. The whole system must be controlled to be effective. The entire process must be looked at, not just the area where they manufacture a saleable product.

Failure #4 – Allowing the Quality Improvement Process to Become A Problem-Solving Committee

There is a saying, “When you are up to your ears in alligators, it is difficult to remember your original objective was to drain the swamp.” Solving problems is critically important but the problems won’t go away until a systematic review of the entire process occurs. Corrective measures are different from preventive measures.

Thank you to Mr. Crosby for this tool to analyze the Quality Improvement Process. It is just as valid in 2012 as it was 1987.

How Come Hardly Anything Ever Gets Better? The Case for Quality Improvement.

How do you create quality improvement?

Quality Improvement from the Quality College

In 1987, I had the privilege to attend the Quality College in Winter Park, FL. It was a highly informative week and I have kept the binder and used it as a reference ever since, although I haven’t gone back to it for a few years.

When I started to develop a page for the teachings of Philip Crosby I pulled out the binder and reviewed the material. Near the back I found a letter from Philip Crosby titled “How come hardly anything ever gets better?” A similar question was posted on LinkedIn so it seemed a good place to start.

Mr. Crosby’s first point was that no one, not the powerful or the powerless were against quality improvement. All of his books, speeches and educational material showed the financial fact that doing things right the first time cost less than doing things wrong and fixing them. Products, services, prisons, morals, the judiciary, Congress, movies, taxis – just about everything needs improvement.

Since everyone was in favor of improvement and opportunities abound, there should be an epidemic of things getting better. That begged the question; why is hardly anything getting better?

Who is Responsible for Quality Improvement?

Mr. Crosby came up with 3 basic reasons:

  1. The highest paid and most talented people in a company do not work on improvement. They produce strategy books, planning manuals, marketing reports, five year plans etc that are shown like merit badges but are not used or implemented. Everyone is working hard on things that make little difference.
  2. People who understand a subject do not get help in determining a policy for improvement. Nationally known consumer advocate groups have no experience in quality management. Most business media experts talk about quality and yet their experience is limited. Getting a common definition of “quality” would be difficult and it has been overlaid with emotion.
  3. 3.      Management and labor do not understand each other. There are very few members of management that have ever actually done the work they supervise. Motivation of the workers is the most popular theme for quality improvement programs. Yet it is management that needs to realize they are the cause of the problems by the way they manage. Union management falls into the same boat as company executives.

The Results of Quality Improvement

Companies that create a renaissance in terms of changing management operating attitudes have drastically improved their products and services and reaped the reward to the bottom line. Companies have already paid for quality, isn’t it time they should get what is coming to them?

Has There Been Quality Improvement?

As I read the letter in many ways I agreed with Mr. Crosby. However looking back over the past 25 years, I also realized that we have come a very long way in large part thanks to Mr. Crosby, Dr. Deming, Dr Juran and Dr. Shewhart. So I invite you to comment. What improvements have you seen? Are things getting better or is hardly anything getting better?

Point 14 – Top Management Commitment to Action

Clearly define top management’s permanent commitment to ever improving quality and
productivity, and their obligation to implement all of these principles. Indeed, it is not enough that top management commit themselves for life to quality and productivity. They must know what it is that they are committed to—that is, what they must do. Create a structure in top management that will push every day on the preceding 13 Points, and take action in order to accomplish the transformation. Support is not enough: action is required!

Dr. W. Edwards Deming

What is Management’s Job – Commitment to Action

One of my father’s favorite sayings was, “lead, follow or get out of the way”. Management’s job is to lead. There must be a commitment to constant and on-going improvement. Each and every morning, management must look at their operation and decide what needs improvement and make a commitment to take action.

The Price of Failed Commitment to Action

If management does not make a commitment to constant and on-going improvement, it
will not happen. Management does not have to implement  the change but they must lead the change or their employees will end up building internal empires or chasing projects with
a lower value to the company.

Part of creating this commitment is developing a structure that guides the employees to
an on-going commitment of improvements in quality and productivity. Management must establish a system, indicate its’ importance to the company and demonstrate their own commitment to constantly and forever improving. It does not have to be fancy, but management must believe and support it.

The Call for Commitment to Action

There is a childhood chant, “Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will
never hurt me.” I wish it were true. How many suicides were prompted by cruel words? Words have power, the power to build up or the power to tear down.When management stands up and says “this is who we are and this is what we stand for” it can change the world.

My first job was with an ethical pharmaceutical company. We had a simple rule,
“Would you want your child to take this medicine?” If the answer was no, we threw it away. Every person on the line had the ability to call the supervisor and point out a problem. Each and every person on that line knew the importance of what they did and that attitude came from the top down. The VP of manufacturing walked through the plant several times a day and any operator
could stop him with a question or a concern. We had power and pride.

So what are you going to do, lead, follow or get out of the way?

Point 13 -Teaching Old Dogs New Tricks – Encourage Education

 

Old dogs like to learn new tricks

If you stop training with the basics you will get a bored and desctructive dog and employee

Encourage education

Institute a vigorous program of education, and encourage self improvement for everyone. What an organization needs is not just good people; it needs people that are improving with education. Advances in competitive position will have their roots in knowledge.

Dr.W. Edwards Deming

Education the antidote to boredom

One of the interesting things I love about training in German Shepherds is they love to learn. It takes about two years to get one to search ready status but that
is only the begin. If you try to stop there, you will get a bored and probably
destructive dog. Instead we train new skills; air scent, then tracking,
obstacles, human remains, evidence articles, the list is as long as your imagination. The dogs love it and the benefit to the search team is a strong and capable canine with the ability to always get the job done no matter what the job is.

People aren’t that much different. Someone who does the same tasks year after year without change can get bored and stale. Providing regular and varied education keeps a person’s mindsharp. When it comes time for someone to come up with a new idea the person who you trained will most likely be the one to come up with the answer.

Encourage Education in the Hourly Workforce

  My first job as a production supervisor was an education in itself. I had one employee that was intelligent and articulate but kept making serious mistakes. This was a person I wanted to promote and instead I was regularly writing up violations for the silliest of mistakes. It was coming to the point where I was going to have to terminate this individual. As I reviewed his personnel file, I found a note he had written giving a friend permission to pick up the employee’s paycheck. I started to see a glimmer of the problem. The next day I had the man read a procedure and sign off that he had read and understood it. He made a good show of taking time on each page and flipping pages. As he tried to make his exit from my office, I had him sit down and we discussed the procedure. It didn’t take long for us both to know he couldn’t read. I got him signed up with literacy volunteers and it wasn’t long before the problems we had been experiencing went away. Encouraging education made the difference for both the employee and the company.

Encourage Education in the Salaried Workforce

As a person gains experience, it can be difficult to find courses being offered in their field where they should be the student. In more than a few cases, I’ve taken courses where the professor posted their credentials and I realized my credentials were better. I could leave and demand my money back or I could sit there and listen. When I have chosen to sit and listen, I generally find a kernel of wisdom I hadn’t thought of. It generates a whole new train of thought that just may solve a problem I’ve been working on. I also started studying Spanish, I don’t think translators jobs are in jeopardy but thinking in a new language helps me come up with a new perspective. Encourage education for both your employees and yourselfto reap long term benefits.

Point 7 – Leaders Help Others

 

helping others

 

 

Institute leadership
Adopt and institute leadership aimed at helping people do a better job. The responsibility of managers and supervisors must be changed from sheer numbers to quality. Improvement of quality will automatically improve productivity. Management must ensure that immediate action is taken on reports of inherited defects, maintenance requirements, poor tools, fuzzy operational definitions, and all conditions detrimental to quality.
W.
Edwards Deming

 

Leaders
Help Others Do a Better Job
“Lead, follow or get out of the way” was one of my
father’s favorite sayings. I could call on Dad at any hour for help in physics,
or building, or just about anything other than cars. Dad wouldn’t do things for
me. He did show me tricks and short cuts and rules of analysis that allowed me
to do it myself. This is the essence of what Dr. Deming is talking about when
he says to institute leadership. Real leaders help other do a better job.
Managers are Leaders
and Help Others
As a manager your job is to teach, aid and assist your
employees to be successful and productive. Not to do the job for them. Like Dad
you are there with your door open, always investigation tools that will make it
easier for your employees to do a quality job with high productivity. You must
be available as a resource and then sometimes you must tie a gag on your mouth
and let an employee learn from a mistake. However, a good leader sets up the
employee for success not failure and never plays “I gotcha”
The Benefits of
Leaders who Help Others
If you are good at your job, then your employees will be
also. If your employees are good at their jobs they will be more productive,
and produce good quality work. The company will be more profitable and stay in
business providing jobs. It is so simple, good leaders help others.
Institute leadership

helping others